5 Ways to Solve Dog Leash Pulling Problems

Are you tired of dog leash pulling problems? If so, there is hope! Dog training Patriot K-Nine has a few suggestions that can help. We have compiled the top 5 ways to solve dog leash pulling problems and discuss how these solutions work. Some are easy and quick fixes while others will take some time and consistency but will be worth it in the end!

Why do dogs pull on their leashes in the first place?

Dogs may be uncomfortable with other people or things nearby, such as another dog they could become aggressive towards. It is also possible for them to think that it is “play time” and compete for your attention. Finally, some dog breeds are just born more energetic and high strung than others; this typically applies to smaller dog breeds, such as terriers or pugs.

In the dog world, dog leashes are like umbilical chords. They basically provide a dog’s life force since it is attached and gives them the ability to move about freely. Since pulling on dog leashes is a dog’s natural reaction, it can be hard to keep them from doing so without making them feel restricted. Is there another way to solve this problem?

The Solutions

One very simple dog training solution is to make sure to keep a dog’s excitement levels in check. Dogs are naturally excited creatures, always ready for a dog-walk and will take advantage of any lapse on the dog owner’s attention to break free and explore. One way to curb this is by not letting them wear out their dog leash pulling energy off with extra dog walks or excessive playtime before the dog walk. A dog should also be walked on leashes that are strong enough for the dog breed. For instance, a Labrador retriever would have less trouble with a leash that is made of thicker material than one made of thin rope or twine which can easily break under pressure. Finally, dog trainers recommend starting out the dog leash pulling training with dog treats. This is because dogs are more likely to follow a dog’s lead when it comes to walking on the dog leash if there is something in it for them, such as an occasional dog treat or tasty snack.

Another simple and popular way to solve this problem of dog leash pulling problems is by using a harness instead of a collar. Harnesses are not only more dog friendly but also dog safe. This is because dog harnesses distribute the pressure of a strong dog pulling across their entire chest and shoulder area, whereas dog collars put all that pressure on one point in the neck which can cause injury to an animal if they pull too hard or long enough.

Dog harnesses are also more dog friendly since they allow dogs to pull without choking themselves.

Dog trainers have found that a dog leash pulling dog training alternative can be used when teaching a dog not to jump on people or other animals while out walking the dog. One way of doing this is to teach them what “no” means by using their own dog leash pulling dog training instincts against them. For instance, if you are walking your dog and they see a cat or other dog that manages to escape their dog leash’s grasp, then suddenly the dog will begin barking at this new animal because it is now free in an area where dogs normally do not have freedom of movement. The key here is to take advantage of dog’s natural dog leash pulling instincts. Teaching your dog to sit instead can be easier if you take them for a dog walk while they are wearing their dog harness, as the pressure from this will naturally inhibit most dogs from jumping on people or animals in front of them. However, it is important that owners keep an eye out and make sure their dog is comfortable with the dog leash pulling dog training method.

Dogs are curious and energetic creatures, and for that reason they can be hard to train at times because of dog leash pulling problems. However, it is possible to resolve this issue without making them feel restricted by using some simple dog training tips such as harnesses instead of collars, dog leash pulling dog training treats, and more.

Tips and tricks to stop the leash pulling:

  1. Use a harness instead of a traditional dog collar. A dog’s neck is very sensitive while its back and hips are less so; attaching the leash to the front of their chest can help reduce strain on your dog’s windpipe if they pull too hard.
  2. Make sure your dog is tired and ready for a walk. Dogs should have already been walked at least once that day, if not twice or three times depending on their age and health status.
  3. If you know there are dogs nearby, avoid walking in the same direction as they are going. This will help prevent conflict between your dog (who may want to get closer) and the dog on the other end of the leash (who may want your dog far away).
  4. Give treats when they are doing something right. This can be anything from not pulling too hard on their leashes or staying still while you wrap up a conversation with someone nearby, for example. Make sure that these treats are small and easily digestible.
  5. Train your dog to sit before you attach the leash on their collar or harness. This will help prevent them from getting excited too early in the walk, which can lead to pulling on the leash as a way of demanding attention while also trying to burn off some steam.
  6. Be consistent about rewarding good behavior with treats and applying a dog training leash that is comfortable for both you and your dog. Before long, they will learn to stop pulling on their leashes when walking with you!

Conclusion

Now you know how to stop dog leash pulling without making them feel restricted by using some simple dog training tips such as harnesses instead of collars, dog leash pulling dog training treats, and more. Before long, they will learn to stop pulling on their leashes when walking with you! You can also teach your dog not pull too hard on the leash while out for a walk if you take advantage of dog’s natural dog-leash-pulling instincts. Teaching your dog to sit before attaching the leash is another way that owners have found helpful in stopping this bad habit all together. It may be difficult at first but it is possible to get through these challenges by being consistent about rewarding good behavior with treats or applying a dog training leash that is dog-friendly for both you and your dog. Want professional help with this issue? Give us a call at (910) 920-1000.

 

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